Life Lessons From The Man Who Stood Up To Trump

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Recently Jorge Ramos (head of Univision and voice of Latino voters), stood up to Donald Trump in a press conference. He pressed Trump with some serious and very important questions regarding immigration, before Trump had security remove him from the building, which made the national headlines. The whole scene made the national news, which is the most press the relatively unknown Ramos is used to. So if you’re interested in what makes the man who took on Trump tick, listen to what he has to say in a interview right here.
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An Early Lesson

“I learned very early on that I had to question everything, because what I was seeing wasn’t necessarily the truth or the right thing. It wasn’t right that there was no democracy in Mexico. It wasn’t right that my mother couldn’t go to college. It wasn’t right that Catholic priests would hit me.”
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On Journalism

“Elie Wiesel says that neutrality only helps the oppressor, never the victim. And I think you can apply that to journalism.”
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On What’s Real

“You have to show reality as it is, not as you wish it to be.”
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On Giving His Number To Trump

“I sent Trump a handwritten note requesting an interview with my cell-phone number in it. That was a huge mistake. You should never, ever give your cell-phone number to Donald Trump. You know what he did with it? He put it on the Internet. I was at my office midmorning, and I tried to make a phone call. I couldn’t. My phone kept getting thousands of messages and calls. I’ve never been attacked that way before. The vast majority of the messages were negative—the worst insults. But the funny thing about it is that I even got some messages from people trying to sell me things or send auditions for songs.”
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On His Confrontation

“I knew I had to do something back. I had to react in a very public way. We realized he was going to do a news conference in Dubuque, Iowa. And we thought, correctly, that few journalists would follow him all the way to Dubuque.
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The Luxury Of Shrimp

“I still remember when I could only eat shrimp once a year if I was lucky. My father used to take the family to this restaurant, and we were allowed to ask for anything. But after asking for shrimp, I could see my dad’s face already start calculating how much it was going to cost him. A family of four brothers and a sister—seven in total. A middle-class family could not give shrimp to seven. I remember feeling guilty when my father ordered, because I got the sense that he was not asking for the most expensive plate because he just couldn’t afford it. So for me, shrimp still means luxury.”
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On Freedom

“When I landed at LAX on January 2, 1983, I carried everything that I owned: one bag, some papers, and my guitar. Just imagine that everything you own you can carry—that’s freedom.”
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On Death

“When somebody dies in the United States, you have a meal, and a few days later you are supposed to be ready to move on. That’s impossible in Latin America. You don’t move on. You are stuck to the past. We even have the Day of the Dead, on which those who died come back, and in an incredible, surreal ceremony we bring to the cemetery the food and the music that they liked.”
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On Hate

“Hate is contagious. A few seconds after Donald Trump has told me something hateful, somebody else repeats it. He has legitimized what people only dare say in their kitchens and bedrooms.”
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On George W. Bush

“George W. Bush was the first U. S. president who thought that he spoke Spanish. Most of the time, he was unintelligible, but voters appreciated that he tried. I asked him about the 537 votes that defined the 2000 election in Florida. He told me that most likely those votes were from Latinos. His strategy paid off.”
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On Being An Immigrant

“I’m always afraid that I’m going to lose everything again. That’s something that happens to almost all immigrants. I’m still working as if I didn’t have enough.”
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What’s Really Difficult

“I’ve already done the most difficult thing for any human being, which is leave everything behind and start all over again.”
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On Happiness

“Happiness for me is the people whom you love, love you back.”
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